Facebook wants your nudes – to protect against revenge porn

Facebook wants to combat revenge porn - by having you upload your own nudes

Facebook wants to algorithmically combat revenge porn, and is currently testing a new system to do so in Australia, the Australia Broadcasting Corporation reports.

Here’s how the system works.

Potential victims of revenge porn – that is, when someone posts the nude photos of someone else without their consent – can opt-in to the program, led by Australian government agency e-Safety. The organization then instructs the potential victim to send a nude photo of themselves to themselves via Facebook Messenger. The algorithms will then match your nude photo to any others uploaded on the site – allegedly without needing to store the photo on Facebook’s own servers.

“We see many scenarios where maybe photos or videos were taken consensually at one point, but there was not any sort of consent to send the images or videos more broadly,” e-Safety Commissioner Julie Inman Grant told ABC.

Grant cites that one in five Australian women aged 18-45 are victims of having their private photos shared beyond their original intent.

Facebook won’t store the images you send to yourself that are entered into this “library” of assets – instead, it stores a digital fingerprint of the file, used to recognize when any matching images are uploaded without actually saving the contents of the images.

“They’re not storing the image, they’re storing the link and using artificial intelligence and other photo-matching technologies,” Grant said. “So if somebody tried to upload that same image, which would have the same digital footprint or hash value, it will be prevented from being uploaded.”

This isn’t the platform’s first effort to fight revenge porn, either. Back in April, Facebook introduced a photo-matching technology in the U.S. that prevents the re-sharing of already images that were previously reported and taken down.

Images will also be matched against uploads on Instagram. Australia is just one of four countries participating in this nude-blocking program, but Facebook is yet to release a full list of the others.

  • BeanMeister22

    Of course nothing will stop you from making changes to those photos, and then this ridiculous FB idea, will of course be useless. BTW will these “special photos” also be subject to FB’s policy of being able to use your pics for any purpose they want? And of course, just like the TSA does not view and share your full-body x-ray pic (it’s already been proven they do), I’m sure FB employees will respect your private pics…NOT!